Dalit Freedom Network Canada

India's Untouchable Dalits

Dalit Freedom Network Canada is committed to freeing the Dalits from a life of poverty, exploitation, and slavery through education, healthcare, and economic development.

  • Dalit Freedom Network posted

    Campaign Donations Matched till May 31st

    Last week, the "What Will You Do For Freedom?" campaign launched! Till May 31st every dollar you raise will be matched. That means, if you raise $150, you provide the $300 needed to send a Dalit child to school for a year! Learn more

  • Dalit Freedom Network posted

    What Will You Do For Freedom? Join the Campaign

    Do something for freedom this spring by helping a Dalit child go to school. There are 24,000 Dalit children attending our schools and many are not yet sponsored. It only takes $300 to pay for a child’s essential educational costs for a full year. Give today or start a fundraiser to unlock the door to freedom for Dalit children. Learn more

    Give before May 31st your donations will be matched, to double your impact!  

     

  • Dalit Freedom Network posted

    The World Takes Note of India's Child Labourers

    Recent news articles have been exposing the dark and complex problem of child labour in India. Millions of children are caught up in exploitative work from domestic servitude to street begging. Many of these children come from poor Dalit backgrounds. Please click on the titles below for links to the full articles.  

    Millions of Children Walking the Financial Tightrope to Survive- This article looks at India's child street performers who miss the opportunity of going to school in order to provide income for their families.  

    Child labour: mineral make-up boom raises fears over ethical extraction- The Guardian exposes the child labour that is used in the creation of mineral make-up. 

    The task of protecting India's child cotton pickers- "Rada estimates she is 11 years old, but she can't be certain. She says she has been working in the Indian cotton fields for three years."

    Child labourers Rescued- Recently, 125 children between 5 - 14 were rescued from hotels and leather manufacturing units in Mumbai.  

  • Dalit Freedom Network posted

    Learning to Trust Again

    Kala spent her childhood being sold as a bonded labourer to various men that her mother owed money to. Eventually she was sold into India’s horrific sex trade.

    Then two years ago Kala was rescued by a local NGO. She was brought to our Tarika Center - a place of rehabilitation and restoration for victims of human trafficking and abuse. Since joining Tarika, Kala has been receiving counselling, learning to read and write, and developing new vocational skills.

    It has not been an easy road for Kala, a lifetime of abuse has made it difficult for her to trust people. When she first came to Tarika center Kala was suspicious of everyone and refused to participate in any activities. But the love, unconditional acceptance, and counselling Kala is receiving at the center is helping her heal from her past.

    Today, Kala gets excited about learning new skills and participates in all the center’s activities. She still has a long journey a head of her, but slowly Kala is learning to trust again.

     

  • Dalit Freedom Network posted

    Remembering India’s Forgotten Women

    Every year Dalit Freedom Network celebrates International Women’s Day by holding special events for Dalit women across India. Dressed in their best saris, hundreds of women gather at each event to stand in solidarity with one another.

    It is a day to remember the harsh reality that these women face on a daily basis – discrimination, exploitation, poverty, and violence. Yet, it is also a time of celebration, as we honour Dalit women for their courage, resilience, and dedication to their communities.

    At each meeting women are given information about their rights and the resources that are available to them and their families. Our hope is that these special events will help restore dignity and value to India’s forgotten women. 

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